Tuesday, December 1, 2009

November 09 Bloom

by Richard Chew

Though November weather has been a wet month, my "kampung" rose produced some blooms.


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Monday, November 30, 2009

October 09 Bloom

by Richard Chew

October & November has been a busy month for me. However some of my roses still produce some great blooms.



Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Monday, October 26, 2009

September 09 Bloom

by Richard Chew

Been very busy that I forgotten to post September bloom.

Here goes my favourite for the month.



Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket






Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket



Photobucket






***

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Magnesium or Iron Deficiencies ?

by Richard Chew

I have posted sometime ago on dealing with chlorotic rose.

Chlorosis is usually caused by iron deficiencies. Its symptoms are usually yellowing leaves with dark veins.

I have posted how I resolve this in http://rosegrowing.blogspot.com/2008/11/dealing-with-cholorotic-nozomi-rose.html

However it is often confused with magnesium deficiencies. Both have same symptoms but caused by different pH extreme. I very often mistook the symptom for the other.

Magnesium deficiency is usually caused by too low pH (soil too acidic).

Before treating the deficiencies, it is important to correct the soil pH first before attempting to correct the deficiencies.

Soil acidity could be caused by laying excessive brown mulch or excessive organic fertilizers like fish meal, bone meal, it is important to check what you fed the soil that may have lowered the soil pH.

My favourite method to treat acidic soil is by adding manure fertilizer, such as dry chicken manure or cattle manure. And then follow by liquid seaweed fertilizer. I would feed both soil and on leaves.



***

Thursday, September 24, 2009

The Role & Measures of Nutrients in Plant Growth

Although this article was written on hydrophonics, the understanding on plant nutrients are useful in determining the fertilizer ratio.

http://www.buzzle.com/articles/the-role--measures-of-nutrients-in-plant-growth.html


The Role & Measures of Nutrients in Plant Growth

Environment plays a very important role in plant growth upto a point. Once optimal environmental levels have been achieved in the hydroponics grow room, however, it is the quality of nutrition that determines crop quality and output. The following background information will be useful in understanding of the role of nutrients in hydroponics cultivation.



Nitrogen

Plants absorb nitrogen from fertilizers in both Nitrate (NO3) and ammonium (NH4) forms. Both ammonium and nitrate forms are available in the standard fertilizer mix supplied. It should be noted however, that ammonium levels should be significantly lower than nitrate levels with a safe level being 10 to 20 times nitrogen available in the Nitrate form vis-à-vis the Ammonium form. Ammonium is readily available to plants and can build up to toxic levels in plant tissue if it is not assimilated for growth. Besides, the Nitrogen from Ammonium is difficult to leach away once it is in plant tissue. It is therefore important too ensure that ammonium content in the nutrients is carefully regulated.

Thursday, September 3, 2009

"Smart" fertilizer improves plant growth, prevents pollution from run off [EXT]

Interesting article that I like to share


From Penn State


University Park, Pa. -- A new "smart" phosphorus fertilizer, developed by Penn State horticultural scientists, improves plant root growth, drought tolerance, shoot quality and flowers while also preventing up to 90 percent of the nutrient run off that can foul waterways. The new fertilizer is currently undergoing its first Pennsylvania field trials with the aid of a grant from the Commonwealth's Department of Agriculture. However, field trials in Florida have been ongoing since 1998 and have shown high performance of ornamentals grown in sandy soils prone to leaching.

Monday, August 31, 2009

How To Determine Ammonium/Nitrate Ratio [EXT]

This is good article to understand the impact of low/high Ammonium/Nitrate Ratio.


How To Determine Ammonium/Nitrate Ratio


Nitrogen is the building block of amino acids, proteins and chlorophyll. Plants can absorb nitrogen either as Nitrate (NO3-) or Ammonium (NH4+), and therefore, the total uptake of nitrogen usually consists of a combination of these two forms.

The ratio between Ammonium and Nitrate is of a great significance, and affects both plants and soil/medium.

For optimal uptake and growth, each plant species requires a different ammonium/nitrate ratio. The correct ratio to be applied also varies with temperature, growth stage, pH in the root zone and soil properties.


Friday, August 28, 2009

August 09 Bloom

by Richard Chew

August is good month. Lots of sun and this time managed to reduce the fertilizer burnt. Check out the photos!






Photobucket



Photobucket
 

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Top Layer - Soil Ammendment

by Richard Chew

It is almost a year since I started this blog. I am really glad that I make many new friends. I like to thank you for visiting and dropping your kind comments.

Though I made some good progress and experience some success, I feel there is still more to learn.

In this posting, I like to write about soil amendment. I learned that after transplanting the rose plants, over time the soil may deplete in certain nutrients or the soil pH may deviate outside the favourable range.

And sometimes the varying factor may be caused by neither of the above, the weather itself may affect how the plant uptake the nutrients, and this could be why you may hear that rose plant deteriorate due to lack of sun or too much direct noon sun or rain and etc.

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Fuller Flower Development

by Richard Chew

After experimenting some ways to get long & short burst flower buds, I noticed it compromised fuller flower development. And very often the flower petals burnt when fertilizer dosage is too high.

I reasoned if I can maintain strong stem development but reduce the rate of flower bud development, I may get fuller flower development.

The following is some of the progress of my Fusilier Rose. Pay attention to the size and depth of flower petal.



Photobucket



Photobucket


Friday, July 31, 2009

July 09 Bloom

by Richard Chew

This month snap some pictures of my miniature bloom. Unfortunately most experienced fertilizer burnt.


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket





Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Photobucket


Monday, July 13, 2009

The Carbon/Nitrogen Ratio

I found the way to calculate carbon nitrogen ratio and help me determine the amount to mix.

http://www.organicgardening.com/featureprint/1,7759,s1-5-21-112,00.html


Put your math skills to work and figure out if your compost has a balanced carbon to nitrogen ratio.

The carbon/nitrogen ratio

If you are a compost nerd, you might already know that the ideal ratio of carbon to nitrogen in a compost pile is about 30:1. A pile with that balance of materials will rot steadily, and it will yield nutrient-rich compost.

But how do you know what your pile's ratio is? "The most important factor in estimating the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio is how much water is present," explains Eric Evans, Ph.D., laboratory director of Woods End Research Laboratory in Mt. Vernon, Maine. "Dry materials are generally in the range of 40 to 50 percent carbon, and sloppy, wet materials are generally 10 to 20 percent carbon." Here are the specifics on many common materials. After you've scanned through these, you'll see how to calculate your pile's exact Carbon/Nitrogen ratio.








Do the math
To calculate the carbon-to-nitrogen of your compost mix, use the chart above to find the approximate percentages of carbon and nitrogen in your ingredients. Even if you're unlikely to weigh every ingredient you add to your heap, this formula will give you an idea of how to adjust the proportions of materials in your pile to get finished compost more quickly.

1. Calculate your pile's Total Carbon Value by multiplying the percent carbon of each ingredient by the number of parts (by weight) of that ingredient and then adding up the carbon totals for all the ingredients
2. Do the same for the nitrogen.
3. Divide the carbon by the nitrogen to get the C:N ratio. If it's between 25 and 35, your pile should compost beautifully. If the ratio is higher or lower than that, adjust the proportions of ingredients to bring it into the range of 25 to 35 parts carbon for each one part nitrogen.

Here's an example of how the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio works when you apply the formula to real-life amounts of real-life compost ingredients:

Starting with 50 pounds of nonlegume hay, 10 pounds of kitchen scraps, and 2 pounds of coffee grounds:
50 lbs hay x 40% C = 20 lbs. C
10 lbs kitchen scraps x 10% C = 1 lb. C
2 lbs coffee grounds x 25 % C = 0.5 lb. C
20 + 1 + 0.5 =21.5 Total Carbon Value

50 lbs hay x 1% N = 0.5 lb. N
10 lbs kitchen scraps x 1% N = 0.1 lb N
2 lbs coffee grounds x 1 % N = 0.02 lb. N
0.5 + 0.1 + 0.02 = 0.62 Total Nitrogen Value

21.5/0.62= 34.7 parts carbon to 1 part nitrogen

Saturday, June 27, 2009

June 09 Bloom

June has been a busy month for me. Though I am 'quiet' in my blog, but my roses are doing great and been flowering well.

I like to share some of the new blooms in June here.


Rose Fusilier

Photobucket



Photobucket





Photobucket



Photobucket





Constance Spry

Photobucket


Other roses

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Sunday, June 7, 2009

Growing Rose - First 90 days - Part 6

by Richard Chew

If you can get past 60 days with reblooms and healthy leaves, definitely you are doing the right thing and heading the right direction. Good work!

At this stage I would try to reduce the frequency of fertilizing, and increase the dosage instead. Perhaps 3 to 6 times higher amount at every 2 months (longer intervals). Recently I have included blood meal. It has good source of protein that aids strong growth. But this is optional.

I use organic liquid fertilizer like seaweed, blood meal, bone meal & fish emulsion, almost daily at very diluted concentration. I make sure the concentration is correct otherwise may cause fertlizer burnt.

If growing conditions are right, there is little need to be done other than to enjoy seeing the rose growing rapidly.

If at this stage the rose plant is not doing well, then you may have to move the rose plant to more direct sun or less direct sun and repeat the entire first 90 days tips. Also check the soil drainage.

There may be a need to tweak the fertilizing but I won't mention here in this posting, perhaps in a new series.

I conclude this series here. Please feel free to email your pictures of your new roses. Happy growing!!

Below is the rebloom of my new rose plant.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket


***

Tuesday, June 2, 2009

Spring and Fall Rose Tonic

This is extracted from Rose Magazine. An interesting write up on applying rose tonic. http://www.rosemagazine.com/articles04/rose_tonic/

by By Mark Whitelaw, Kindly Provided by Laura Whitelaw

Here's a copy of my Spring and Fall Rose Tonic. It is a modification of a recipe passed to me by a very wise and 83-years young rosarian. It assumes your soil pH ranges from 6.5 to 7.5, clay-based and/or rich in calcium.

8 parts alfalfa meal
2 parts cottonseed meal (arsenic-free)
2 parts rock phosphate (or colloidal phosphate; but not super phosphate)
2 parts bone meal
1 part blood meal
1 part Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate)


Thoroughly combine ingredients and apply 1 cup (.24 l) of mixture for each foot (30 cm) of shrub height. Lightly scratch the mixture into the soil using caution not to harm the roots. Water-in thoroughly.

This mixture is good in the spring and the fall, and can be applied as a 'tonic' to all blooming perennials, roses, azaleas and fruit-producing trees and plants.

- If soil pH is above 7.5 (and it shouldn't be), reduce the Epsom salts by half to reduce the possibility of applying too much magnesium.

- For new plantings, add 1 part Greensand (0-1-5) to the Fall Tonic

- The NPK of the constituents varies by manufacturer; however, on average these proportions will create a 50-110-20 (or approx. 2-4-1 NPK ratio) slow-release, environment-safe fertilizer. It will not "burn" the foliage or contaminate the soil.

- Blood and bone meals may attract dogs and cats. If this is a problem, repel with pepper spray around the watering well.

- Feather meal may be substituted for alfalfa meal, but the quantities should be cut in half. Feather meal is also quicker to decompose and will not provide sustained nitrogen release beyond about 21 days. Furthermore, alfalfa has micronutrients not found in feather meal.

- Alfalfa meal is quite dusty; a dust mask should be worn when mixing the ingredients.


I apply this tonic immediately after spring and fall pruning (here, late Feb and late Aug). It is so effective, supplemental fertilizations are not required but once-a-month in the spring - until I let the roses rest during summer's heat. For supplemental fertilizations, I use a blend of fish emulsion, kelp liquid concentrate, and un-sulfured molasses @ 2 Tbsp, 1 Tbsp, and 1 Tbsp (30ml, 15ml, 15ml) respectively per gallon of water and pour this around the watering well of each rose.

It is best, if you have a lot of roses, to purchase the ingredients in bulk from the farm/ranch or feed store vis-à-vis the nursery or mailorder. For example, alfalfa meal at the feed store costs about $8 for 40 lbs. At the nursery, it costs $7 for 4 lbs. - and it's the same stuff, just packaged with a prettier label. Use caution when purchasing from a feed store, however, to ensure the alfalfa does not contain salt, as this will be detrimental to your soil. (Try a taste test.)

And if you grow roses in pots or sell them commercially, sprinkle 1 or 2 cups of mixture around the top of the pot. When you water the plants, the fertilizer acts like a timed-release mixture that can cost much, much more.

It should also be noted that some rosarians who live in cold climates report they have reduced aphid and thrips infestations if they withhold fertilizing until after first flush in the spring, thus letting the rose generate growth and blooms from the stored energy in the roots (e.g., like bulb perennials). This would not work for us who live in warmer climates because first flush may not end until May or June, when our temperatures quite regularly get above 95°F(35°C) and our roses like to rest during summer's heat.

I hope that helps a little. But remember, this is what works for me and my garden. (By Mark Whitelaw, Kindly Provided by Laura Whitelaw)

***

Sunday, May 31, 2009

May 09 Bloom

by Richard Chew

Its May bloom display!

The bloom this month experienced some burnt due to hotter weather and over dose of fertilizing.

Despite the burnt, the flower petals were densely formed.

Photobucket





The following is the outcome of the Long Burst flower bud.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket


Short burst flower bud

Photobucket

Photobucket



Purple rose. Strange because it changes colour to dark pink over time.

Photobucket

Photobucket


Photobucket

Photobucket



***